All because of water lilies

There is a muse behind every great piece of art. The inspiration for my wedding literally floated to me. The ceremony venue – The Nine Muses which is a group of granite sculptures at Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, NJ – has a moat pond around it. The water lilies are yellow and pink and extremely muse-worthy. Need I elaborate further?

Without further adieu, I ordered a dozen floating silk lilies from Save-on-crafts in both yellow and fuchsia.

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Water Lilies 2
Photography by Maya Nachi
Water Lilies
Photography by Maya Nachi

I wanted to pay homage to my ancestral home, Rajasthan, through my bridesmaids. The saris were leheriya which is a traditional style of tie dye practiced in Rajasthan that results in brightly colored cloth. This technique gets its name from the Rajasthani word for wave. The metal embroidery on the saris is called gota work, which is also part of Rajasthani heritage. Lastly, the bodla is traditional jewelry used to adorn the feminine forehead hairline. Essentially, I wanted my bridesmaids to look like Rajasthani princesses, which is only appropriate as Rajasthan means the land of kings. I bought the leheriya saris from Rana’s at Johari Bazaar in Jaipur, India which were presented in brocade cases from Kinari Bazaar in Chandni Chowk. (Mission #4)

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In case it rained or was unbearably sunny (as if that’s ever a bad thing) – the comfort of my lady guests was top priority. I got parasols from Just Artifacts in theme shades- yellow, orange, rose pink and fuchsia.

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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
Parasols
Photography by Maya Nachi
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At Indian weddings, it is customary for the gentlemen to wear safas, which is a turban comprised of a long colorful strip of fabric. I decided to ordain the color code on this tradition by conferring orange safas for the men on the bride’s side and pink safas for the men on the groom’s side.
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography

 

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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography

The bridal bouquet by Rangoli Weddings consisted of pink and yellow roses along with pink feathers for a playful quirky effect.

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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography

The mandap is a covered structure held up by four pillars under which the Hindu wedding ceremony takes place. Ours was created by Rangoli Weddings, decorated with yellow and pink silk fabric, crystal strings and floral balls. Mandaps can get extremely ornate, but I wanted to keep it simple as the venue provided ample aesthetics. My philosophy was: less is more.

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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
Mandap
Photography by Maya Nachi
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography

We had a traditional Vedic Hindu wedding ceremony and we wanted all the rituals to be conveyed in the most articulate fashion to our guests. For this, I sought my father’s expertise on the Hindu religion and philosophy to create the script for the wedding program. On the creative front, I turned to The Indian Paper Forest shop on Etsy. Here, I was able to choose the color pallet of my choice: pinks, yellow and orange. Surprise Surprise.

Program 1Program 2

Wedding Program (2)
Photography by Maya Nachi
Wedding program
Photography by Maya Nachi

My little cousins, Shalini and Shailee, helped me out with these “Thank you” signs that I used for our “Thank you” notes. We held them and posed for a photograph – which was made into a magnet. This way, we would eternally grateful on the fridges of all our guests for their honorable presence on our special day. Truly.

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The picture below was used for the magnets for our “thank you” notes.

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The note below was custom-written for everyone. It was similar to the theme of the wedding program and from the same shop on Etsy. I got matching yellow envelopes from Amazon, which were amazing as they were made of 100% recycled paper and had great dimension and character. They are called Mr. Ellie Pooh Earth Friendly Envelopes.

thank you note

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TY note

This is the final produce that all our wedding guests received via mail:

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The last of the pink and yellow: hand-painted Just Married sign from Paper Source for the limo that whisked us away after the wedding.

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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography

Now for some un-thematic, but very fun details. For the reveal, we had a dozen balloons each which matched our outfits.

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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography

Red is an auspicious and bridal color in Indian culture. Traditionally, the bride’s sisters accompany her down the aisle to the wedding alter. I wore red lehenga with an orange dupatta and walked down the aisle under a red canopy held by my sisters. The canopy was made from red embroidered fabric procured from a fabric wholesaler in New York City held together by poles covered in matching red fabric and wrapped with garlands of silk marigold flowers.

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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography
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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography

Lastly, there was the Dom for a proper commencement.

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Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography

Our wedding was featured on Maharani Weddings – the ultimate Indian wedding planning resource.

Image credits: Photography by A.S. Nagpal Photography // Photography by Maya Nachi //

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